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20120928
20121006
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and that compliance with the law is not optional. the man who heads the firm shall accused of voting fraud, is defending his firm tonight. senior correspondent eric shawn has that story. >> bret: the head of the company at the center of the voter fraud allegations says thinks firm will be vindicated. >> i think we did a very good job. >> a republican operative claims a handful of exworkers for violating company policy and the law. his company, strategic allied consulting is being investigated by florida authorities. >> when law enforcement looks into that situation, what they'll find our company had a systemic effort of quality control at that looked for people trying to cheat the system. when we found them we fired them and we have a long paper trail a handful of people we caught cheating the system were fired and turned over to investigators for prosecution. >> of 5,000 workers, he says that fewer than 10 did something wrong. out of florida out of 50,000 forms only about 150 have raised problems and in north carolina out of 15,000 forms, only 5 were flagged. he says his firm also registe
ideas and they were bad yds ideas. bad for america and i was fighting when you were practicing law and representing your contributor in his slum landlord business in chicago. bill: if you get an he change like that wednesday night, what's the likely impact on these uncommitted or spu -- thee voters. >> both of these guys have been through an awful lot of debates in their careers. they will be well prepared. the one thing that has to be cause for optimism for republicans. usually an incumbent president comes out rusty. we saw that in 1984, reagan's first debate was a disaster. george w. bush's debate was a disaster. i don't think it will be a disaster. but you saw on the univision interview. when you are abe incumbent president you are not used to being challenged. bill: what do you think the impact of a potential exchange like we just watched will have on this 15% rasmussen is talking about? >> rich is right. it depends on what it is. there was another debate moment in 2008 that seemed to change the trajectory a little bit. remember when hillary was told people don't like her and s
the antitrust laws. that was ideological and they did not like william jennings bryan because they thought he was a socialist. they said if you want our thinking and the white house, we want somebody who sees things our way. the great line that came after that was that theodore roosevelt could not stay bought. theodore roosevelt said we should have public funding out of the treasury. if you look back at the supreme court in the citizens united case, you see a court that has two dare -- very different views over what is happening. we have your view which is a perfectly respectable view of the aspirations that there will these -- will be these independent groups speaking and saying what they want to say. it will be fully disclosed and it will not be corrupting independents. then you have the minority that caught the reality of most of the spending this year. their view was that this would be funded by giant corporations with specific legislative interests. that is why they will give so much money. it turns out it is not fully disclosed. it turns out it is not for individual candidates. it perha
health care law last june. so how might mitt romney change the high court if he becomes president of the united states? he's already giving all of us some major clues. let's bring in cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns who's taking a closer look. what are you seeing? >> the supreme court doesn't get talked about that much on the campaign trail. but choosing a justice is one of the most important things a president does. it's how on administration puts its mark on some of the nation east toughest, most divisive issues. and we have a look at how mitt romney might handle it if he's president. whenever mitt romney fielded questions during the primaries about his picks for the supreme court, he was armed with a stock republican answer. >> what i would look to do would be to appoint people to the supreme court that will follow strictly the constitution as opposed to to legislating from the bench. >> reporter: but he wouldn't choose a favorite. >> would you pick one, please? >> yes, roberts, thomas, alito and scalia. >> reporter: all that changed in june when roberts cast the
sanjay gupta zeros in what's at stake. >> reporter: since president obama's health care law was enacted 3.1 million people under the age of 26 are now carried by their parents' plans and preventive care is carried 100% by insurance companies. seniors in particular have benefitted on prescription drugs. >> seniors who fall in the coverage gap known as the donut hole will start getting some help. they'll receive 250 dollars to help pay for prescriptions and that will, over time, fill in the donut hole. >> reporter: 5.5 million seniors have saved a total of nearly $4.5 billion on prescription drugs since the law was enacted, according to the health and human services department. he also plans to slow spending on medicare. >> i have strengthened medicare. we have added years to the life of medicare. we did it by getting rid of taxpayer subsidies to insurance companies that weren't making people healthier. >> reporter: by 2014, the law requires everyone to he health insurance whether they purchase it themselves or through their employeers. insurance can't deny you if you have a pre-existing co
ways to reduce the number of abortions. we got to think about why our law enforcement community --our working mothers are in trouble. we have to get free natal care for them. have too many children coming into kindergarten behind, and if we lose them in kindergarten, we lose them for ever. 2500 kids in a program here in omaha that are provided refuge that are being sexually abused in their own home. we got to pay attention to them, and we got to help them and the moms and the community leaders who are trying to help this problem. i do not think we should regulate women in making these decisions. it does not stop there. there is lots more that needs to make sure that that children have a fair and decent opportunity to live to their full potential. >> i am pro life. i believe in the sanctity of life. i believe there should be an exception made for the life of the mother. what we are looking at is an economy that is hurting families. we're looking at an economy that tends to hurt women more. the situation we're in the last four years, it is hurting women. women are not able to find jobs.
thing. my father-in-law talked about being a public servant is the ultimate kind of service, the ultimate job that you can have. he was absolutely correct, because to me there was nothing more satisfying than to be in sacramento, to solve problems, work with everyone together, bring everyone together, and to just chip away, keep solving problems, and serve the people, because as an immigrant, as an immigrant, it is especially very satisfying that you can give something back to this country. you know, to be able to say thank you, to a place that's received you with open arms, and where i saw firsthand that the harder i worked, the more i accomplished, the more i achieved, there was no obstacle there. there was no -- not like in europe, when i grew up, where there were obstacles after obstacles for you to get successful. here there was no obstacle. everyone wished you good luck and everyone said, yeah, you can do it. of course with my outrageous dreams that i had, i even found people in america that said, no, that's impossible, arnold when i said i want to be a leading man in
young as 10 being caught in the act and the kid is taken in by law enforcement and often charged as a criminal for the crime of prostitution, and the man who is buying the services of a minor is sent home. we don't want to ruin your life, we don't want to make things hard for you, go home to your wife and family. >> pretty disturbing and unbelievable thing to hear. we had an extensive conversation. we will bring you our full conversation tomorrow night at 7:00. thanks for joining us. "ac 360" starts now. >>> good evening, everyone. we have breaking news tonight in the wake of the libya tragedy. late word tonight from the u.s. state department they're pulling more staffers out of the embassy in tripoli because of security concerns. also tonight, also security related, new details. they're coming in reaction to our exclusive reporting last night on how quickly officials actually suspected that the killing of four americans in benghazi was an act of terror, and how troubled the subsequent investigation into that deadly assault is turning out to be. today, 16 days after the attack, d
of law. douglas kennedy is live in our newsroom here in new york on that. what did you find out, douglas. >> there are currently 725 convicted criminals on death row in california. now some state residents want all of their lives spared, and they are getting support from a famous prosecutor. >> the $184 million that the death penalty is costing, it's a total waste of money. it's flushing it down the toilet. >> gil garcetti spent 32 years inside the los angeles district attorney's office. >> you prosecuted dozens of death penalty cases. >> we did. we not just prosecuted them but we convicted most of them. >> but garcetti has since changed his mind about giving fell ons the ultimate punishment. he says death penalty cases are simply too expensive and he says he knows from personal experience there is a lot of room for error. >> killing people is a huge responsibility and the criminal justice system isn't always perfect. >> it's not, unfortunately. we are dealing with human beings, so there is fallibility right? >> garcetti is supporting prop 34, which would eliminate the death penalty in c
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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